Blog Posts in 2019

  • Dealing with Aggressive Drivers & Road Rage

    Though it may just seem like a term for someone in a rush, road rage is extreme. Simply put, it can cost the lives of innocent people. Many recognize the experience of driving according to traffic laws when suddenly, a vehicle dangerously speed past as the driver furiously honks and spews profanities. Despite being a safe and aware driver, you cannot predict who you will encounter on the road. ...
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  • What is the 3-Second Rule?

    Of the millions of people on the road, not everyone drives safely and responsibly. Unfortunately, you cannot rely on others to uphold optimal or even acceptable standards of safety. Studies have shown the majority of car accidents happen in under 3 seconds. When you are traveling at high speeds, this may as well be faster than the speed of light for the lack of response time. In 3 seconds or less, ...
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  • March Legal Madness: The N.C.A.A. Will Appeal Recent Anti-Trust Decision

    Following an earlier ruling this month by a Federal District Court, the N.C.A.A. announced on Saturday that they will appeal a ruling which found preventing student athletes from being paid in addition to scholarships and related athletic costs violates anti-trust law. Donald Remy, the N.C.A.A.’s chief legal officer, released a statement saying, “We believe, and the Supreme Court has recognized, ...
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  • It’s National Brain Injury Awareness Month: Here’s What You Need to Know

    The Brain Injury Association of America, or BIAA, has declared March Brain Injury Awareness Month . As a part of their Change Your Mind Campaign, the BIAA is devoting their efforts this month to de-stigmatizing brain injuries through community outreach, empowering survivors of brain injuries as well as their caregivers, and promoting support for patients living with brain injuries. As Dallas ...
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  • Is It Harder to Protect Intellectual Property in the Digital Age?

    In recent years, a common echo heard among legal professionals is that it is more difficult to protect intellectual property in the digital age. Danae Vara Borrell recently explored this very idea in a piece for Forbes . Over the past few decades, rapid advances in technology have reduced the amount of time necessary to take a product to market. This coupled with the rise of e-commerce and its ...
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  • Why Are Hernia Mesh Lawsuits So Common?

    Hernias are extremely painful injuries, usually located in the abdominal wall, which occur when an organ, intestine, or fatty tissue pokes through a hole or weak spot in the muscle or connective tissue surrounding it. For several decades, doctors have been using surgical mesh to repair hernias. In the best cases, surgical mesh decreases operative time, reduces the length of the healing process, ...
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  • Can I Sue For Defective Pharmaceutical Products?

    If you or someone you know, has recently been injured by a defective pharmaceutical product, you may be wondering if it’s possible to file a lawsuit, and if so, against whom. Fortunately, the Dallas product liability attorneys at MR Civil Justice have all the answers you need. Read on to learn more, and contact MR Civil Justice for compassionate and tireless representation today. Defective ...
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  • Antitrust Disputes Expected to Rise in 2019

    Throughout 2018, the employment practices of many U.S. companies were subject to increasingly intense pressure when it came to antitrust practices. Though the year is still young, it looks like 2019 is only gong to see this trend continue to grow. Consider that at the federal level, the Department of Justice went after several companies for “no-poach” agreements last year. The DOJ prosecuted these ...
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  • Whose Documents Are They Anyway?

    The Per Se “Government Misconduct” Exception to the Deliberative Process Privilege As with any privilege, proper application of the deliberative process privilege depends on an understanding of its underlying rationale. Courts strive to interpret such privileges as narrowly as possible so as not to unduly burden the judicial search for truth. [ See United States v. Nixon , 418 U.S. 683, 710 (1974) ...
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